Jubilate Agno, Fragment B, [For I will consider my Cat Jeoffry]

For I will consider my Cat Jeoffry.
For he is the servant of the Living God, duly and daily serving him.
For at the first glance of the glory of God in the East he worships in his way.
For is this done by wreathing his body seven times round with elegant quickness.
For then he leaps up to catch the musk, which is the blessing of God upon his prayer.
For he rolls upon prank to work it in.
For having done duty and received blessing he begins to consider himself.
For this he performs in ten degrees.
For first he looks upon his forepaws to see if they are clean.
For secondly he kicks up behind to clear away there.
For thirdly he works it upon stretch with the forepaws extended.
For fourthly he sharpens his paws by wood.
For fifthly he washes himself.
For sixthly he rolls upon wash.
For seventhly he fleas himself, that he may not be interrupted upon the beat.
For eighthly he rubs himself against a post.
For ninthly he looks up for his instructions.
For tenthly he goes in quest of food.
For having considered God and himself he will consider his neighbor.
For if he meets another cat he will kiss her in kindness.
For when he takes his prey he plays with it to give it a chance.
For one mouse in seven escapes by his dallying.
For when his day’s work is done his business more properly begins.
For he keeps the Lord’s watch in the night against the adversary.
For he counteracts the powers of darkness by his electrical skin and glaring eyes.
For he counteracts the Devil, who is death, by brisking about the life.
For in his morning orisons he loves the sun and the sun loves him.
For he is of the tribe of Tiger.
For the Cherub Cat is a term of the Angel Tiger.
For he has the subtlety and hissing of a serpent, which in goodness he suppresses.
For he will not do destruction if he is well-fed, neither will he spit without provocation.
For he purrs in thankfulness when God tells him he’s a good Cat.
For he is an instrument for the children to learn benevolence upon.
For every house is incomplete without him, and a blessing is lacking in the spirit.
For the Lord commanded Moses concerning the cats at the departure of the Children of Israel
from Egypt.
For every family had one cat at least in the bag.
For the English Cats are the best in Europe.
For he is the cleanest in the use of his forepaws of any quadruped.
For the dexterity of his defense is an instance of the love of God to him exceedingly.
For he is the quickest to his mark of any creature.
For he is tenacious of his point.
For he is a mixture of gravity and waggery.
For he knows that God is his Saviour.
For there is nothing sweeter than his peace when at rest.
For there is nothing brisker than his life when in motion.
For he is of the Lord’s poor, and so indeed is he called by benevolence perpetually–Poor Jeoffry!
poor Jeoffry! the rat has bit thy throat.
For I bless the name of the Lord Jesus that Jeoffry is better.
For the divine spirit comes about his body to sustain it in complete cat.
For his tongue is exceeding pure so that it has in purity what it wants in music.
For he is docile and can learn certain things.
For he can sit up with gravity, which is patience upon approbation.
For he can fetch and carry, which is patience in employment.
For he can jump over a stick, which is patience upon proof positive.
For he can spraggle upon waggle at the word of command.
For he can jump from an eminence into his master’s bosom.
For he can catch the cork and toss it again.
For he is hated by the hypocrite and miser.
For the former is afraid of detection.
For the latter refuses the charge.
For he camels his back to bear the first notion of business.
For he is good to think on, if a man would express himself neatly.
For he made a great figure in Egypt for his signal services.
For he killed the Icneumon rat, very pernicious by land.
For his ears are so acute that they sting again.
For from this proceeds the passing quickness of his attention.
For by stroking of him I have found out electricity.
For I perceived God’s light about him both wax and fire.
For the electrical fire is the spiritual substance which God sends from heaven to sustain the
bodies both of man and beast.
For God has blessed him in the variety of his movements.
For, though he cannot fly, he is an excellent clamberer.
For his motions upon the face of the earth are more than any other quadruped.
For he can tread to all the measures upon the music.
For he can swim for life.
For he can creep.

- Christopher Smart (1722 – 1771)

Or, if you prefer, you can listen to it sung by Miranda Colchester. Thanks to @ashleigh_young for the poem link, and to @marpeck for the video link.

Call for PhD Applications

It’s that time again! VUW is now accepting PhD applications for the 1 July round, and I’m looking for a few good people to come push the boundaries of design and cultural research with me.

Do you have a strong background in sociology, anthropology, humanities, or design?

Are you interested in critically evaluating what happens when you combine different ways of thinking, doing and making?

Would you like some experience tutoring undergraduate design ethnography, multispecies design, or speculative design?

Yes? Great!

I’m available to supervise doctoral studies in any of the following areas:

  • human-animal-technology studies & multispecies design
  • STS approaches to design processes & products
  • creative ethnographic methods & speculative design
  • technosocial controversies & public engagement

Still interested? Excellent!

Here’s everything you need to know about the PhD application process and don’t forget that Victoria Doctoral Scholarships of $23,500 annual stipend + tuition fees are available on a competitive basis. And if that’s still not enough, Wellington is an awesome place to live, work and study!

If you’re interested in applying, please send me a one page summary of your research interests, and don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions about working with me, or other opportunities in VUW’s School of Design.

APPLICATION DEADLINES: 1 MARCH, 1 JULY, 1 NOVEMBER

Interview on our Counting Sheep research

BoneKnitter Sara Hendren has published a thoughtful and kind review on Gizmodo’s Abler website of the BoneKnitter speculative design ethnography project with Dani Clode.

Not only is Sara the kind of generous interviewer who brings out the best in her subjects, but her insightful questions also taught me something about myself and my work–and for that I am incredibly grateful.

Read: “Knitting bones with fact and fiction: A conversation with Design Culture Lab’s Anne Galloway”

“Galloway’s work is aligned with what’s often called speculative design, or design fiction. It is essentially creative cultural research, rooted in designed artifacts. The designs aren’t intended to solve user-based problems or needs; they’re not meant to result in manufactured products. They’re created instead to ask provocative questions, to pose future scenarios that are partly fact and partly fiction, and to form bridges between academic and popular debate around important technological, cultural and socio-political issues. Because these visions are based on people’s lived experiences, and created for public engagement, Galloway refers to what she does as ‘speculative design ethnography’.”

In the interview section, I discuss the rationale behind the BoneKnitter, our design process and Dani’s exceptional craftwork, and the broader research goals that underpin the Counting Sheep project.

Thank you, Sara!

UPDATE: Thanks to Alexis Madrigal for including this interview in The Atlantic: Technology‘s list of 5 Intriguing Things for May 16, 2014.

CFP: Adventures in Speculative Design Ethnography

CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS: IR15 PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP

“Animals, Vegetables & Minerals Online: Adventures in Speculative Design Ethnography”

Full-day workshop @ IR15: Boundaries & Intersections, Bangkok, 22 October, 2014

Organisers: Anne Galloway & Jaz Hee-jeong Choi

MineralThis workshop will introduce participants to the practices of speculative design ethnography, support small groups in exploring its strengths and limitations, and encourage the application of relevant elements to individual research objectives. Drawing from a range of qualitative research traditions, speculative design ethnography comprises a continually evolving set of empirical and creative methods and public engagement strategies. Inspired by artistic provocations rather than corporate or government forecasting activities, “everyday” speculative objects, images, and narratives are created and used to critically examine and challenge common assumptions and expectations about near-future technologies, material, and sociocultural relations—including those related to the Internet. Focussing our attention on animals, vegetables and minerals offers a means to engage with matters of increasing social and cultural concern like future food systems, as well as to critically and creatively explore what happens when humans and nonhumans are put on more equal footing. This focus also allows researchers to explore the online worlds of nonhuman life, and consider the possibilities of nonhuman media production. A creative background is not required to participate, but imagination and interest are a must. We believe that multidisciplinary researchers working on everything from ethnographic methods, big data analysis, and online image-sharing, to internet infrastructure, locative media, and online publics will enjoy the opportunity to think, do, and make some fun and unusual things. Participants will be asked to indicate their interests in these areas, work in small groups to complete exercises, present original design concepts, and discuss everything within the larger group.

READ FULL WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

New course in multispecies design

Visitors inspect animals in enclosures and pools, Taronga Zoo, c. 1916, by Sam Hood. (Courtesy of State Library of New South Wales)

Visitors inspect animals in enclosures and pools, Taronga Zoo, c. 1916, by Sam Hood. (Courtesy of State Library of New South Wales)

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to design with, and for, animals instead of people? How would that change the way we understand them–and ourselves? What would we design?

I’m excited to be teaching a new course next term that will explore these and related questions.

CCDN384: Multispecies Design

Understanding relationships between people and animals is central to future ecological sustainability. This course introduces students to cultural, political and economic forces that shape our interactions with pets, livestock, and wildlife in order to critically and creatively explore how different kinds of design can foster animal, environmental, and human well-being.

This special topic course comprises a weekly lecture that introduces students to a variety of human-animal relations and their cultural, political, ethical, economic, and environmental implications. Weekly tutorials connect these relations and issues to narrative, image, product and service-based design practice. Students are expected to demonstrate their comprehension of these relations, issues, and practices through a pair of creative projects: one visual design and one object or service-based design.

Lecture: Thursdays 11:30-1:20
Tutorial: Thursdays 2:40-4:30

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